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no such file or directory usually indicates that you don't have your PATH environment variable set up correctly.

Have you sourced your ROS setup.sh or setup.bash before you run your Java application?

no such file or directory usually indicates that you don't have your PATH environment variable set up correctly.

Have you sourced your ROS setup.sh or setup.bash before you run your Java application? application?

EDIT

The setup.bash script does not take arguments; running setup.bash roscore is incorrect.

Assuming you have your default bashrc set up to source the ROS setup.bash, running bash -c roscore should result in a running roscore. The docs for Runtime.exec say that it executes the command in a separate process; are you sure it isn't doing anything?

no such file or directory usually indicates that you don't have your PATH environment variable set up correctly.

Have you sourced your ROS setup.sh or setup.bash before you run your Java application?

EDIT

The setup.bash script does not take arguments; running setup.bash roscore is incorrect.

Assuming you have your default bashrc set up to source the ROS setup.bash, running bash -c roscore should result in a running roscore. The docs for Runtime.exec say that it executes the command in a separate process; are you sure it isn't doing anything?

EDIT2

Does your .bashrc source your ROS setup.bash?

You should probably also be checking the process state for the process you spawn, to make sure that it is running, you should check the error output to see if there's anything useful there, and you should check the return code when the process is done, to see if it returned with an error.