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The magic trick (particularly when dealing with Kinect point clouds) is to have serious hardware-accelerated 3D graphics. If you're doing 3D rendering in software, it will be agonizingly slow, no matter what.

Put a different way: a single Kinect pointcloud message is on the order of 10MB. Multiply that by 30fps, and you're putting serious, serious load on your system, even before you have to visualize it.

The PCL OpenNI wrappers and visualization tools might get you better results (although that's outside of ROS proper), but the sheer datarate problem isn't going away.

The magic trick (particularly when dealing with Kinect point clouds) is to have serious hardware-accelerated 3D graphics. If you're doing 3D rendering in software, it will be agonizingly slow, no matter what.

Put a different way: a single Kinect pointcloud message is on the order of 10MB. Multiply that by 30fps, and you're putting serious, serious load on your system, even before you have to visualize it.

The PCL OpenNI wrappers and visualization tools might get you better results (although that's outside of ROS proper), but the sheer datarate problem isn't going away.

If you're willing to handle the clouds at a lower framerate (not that this will solve your visualization problem), take a look at Topic Tools, particularly the throttle node.

The magic trick (particularly when dealing with Kinect point clouds) is to have serious hardware-accelerated 3D graphics. If you're doing 3D rendering in software, it will be agonizingly slow, no matter what.

Put a different way: a single Kinect pointcloud message is on the order of 10MB. Multiply that by 30fps, and you're putting serious, serious load on your system, even before you have to visualize it.

The PCL OpenNI wrappers and visualization tools might get you better results (although that's outside of ROS proper), but the sheer datarate problem isn't going away.

If you're willing to handle the clouds at a lower framerate (not that this will solve your visualization problem), take a look at Topic Tools, particularly the throttle node.